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Thread: Brexit

  1. #21
    always learning ... BlackPeter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkHorse View Post
    The EU have 10 000 officials earning more than the UK Prime Minister, the parliament has no power to even introduce or repeal laws, and their EU laws go from 31 regulating toothbrushes to 109 about pillows to 1246 regarding bread. (Check out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTMxfAkxfQ0 at 33:28 for the laws (hilarious)... all is eye-opening)
    Well, given that British prime ministers appear to be lately either spineless or clowns or both (looking at the incumbent as well as at the likely successor) there is perhaps a reason that they pay some EU officials more than the British PM's ?

    But seriously ... yes, there is a large EU bureaucracy. On the other hand - travelling myself frequently through Europe I find that bread (one of your examples) in Europe (and I mean Europe, not in the UK) is much better, fresher and tastier than in NZ. I do know a German baker quite well - and she appears to be not too worried about all the rules you mentioned when she bakes fresh bread. I assume most of these rules are anyway common sense for people who like good food. I acknowledge however that this excludes many British people .

    And if you look at your other example - toothbrushes ... I don't know how many rules they have in Europe for them, but I know that I pay in a European supermarket half the price for a good toothbrush I would pay in NZ. Maybe - all these rules (if they really exist) are not that bad at all and help to protect the consumers?
    Last edited by BlackPeter; 29-06-2016 at 08:45 AM. Reason: grammar / sentence construction
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  2. #22
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    Ah!

    So the Brits voted to exit so they could set the rules for their own bread and toothbrushes!


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    No matter what happens now, this Brexit thing will be resolved. Whether you like it or not depends on how you judge the outcome eventually to your liking. Sometimes, chaos is good. In fact there is even orderliness in chaos

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by macduffy View Post
    Ah!

    So the Brits voted to exit so they could set the rules for their own bread and toothbrushes!

    Good observation ... I guess the Brits like their traditions of sub-standard food and expensive merchandise. Obviously - they voted as well against deflation and for falling house prices. Win-win;

    Looks like the story keep s unfolding ... who would want a good credit rating? http://news.sky.com/story/1718459/uk...w-after-brexit
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkHorse View Post
    The EU have 10 000 officials earning more than the UK Prime Minister, the parliament has no power to even introduce or repeal laws, and their EU laws go from 31 regulating toothbrushes to 109 about pillows to 1246 regarding bread. (Check out https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTMxfAkxfQ0 at 33:28 for the laws (hilarious)... all is eye-opening)
    John Oliver had something to say on those touted 109 pillow regulations:

    "We blew up that frame...the problem is, most have nothing to do with actual pillows".

    For instance: a breakfast cereal that is cut into 'pillow' shaped pieces; a merger between two auto-part companies that included the phrase 'pillow ball joints'; in reference to a pillow shaped foot pump used for inflating an air mattress.

    He goes on to point out that if the UK want to continue trading with Europe (and presumably they do), then they'll have to meet those '109 pillow regulations' anyway.

    https://youtu.be/iAgKHSNqxa8

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    At the very least the UK can now negotiate trade agreements with EU countries. Rather than only doing what they are told.

    Certainly there will need to be payments and concessions made to the EU (as Switzerland and Norway do, for example), but UK is a much larger buying market so will have more clout. All of those massive trucks travelling through the Tunnel still need to sell their goods to the UK, or their suppliers will fail.

    And if the pound stays lowish the UK should find a ready market elsewhere in the world for their production.

    Not saying it will be simple but there will be a whole bunch of UK bureaucrats in the EU with not much else to do.

  7. #27
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    Default One picture says more than 1000 words - BREXIT explained ...

    Brexit-explained with food.jpg

    Love it - photo with regards from a previous poster (Crackity)
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    Quote Originally Posted by artemis View Post
    At the very least the UK can now negotiate trade agreements with EU countries. Rather than only doing what they are told.

    Certainly there will need to be payments and concessions made to the EU (as Switzerland and Norway do, for example), but UK is a much larger buying market so will have more clout. All of those massive trucks travelling through the Tunnel still need to sell their goods to the UK, or their suppliers will fail.

    And if the pound stays lowish the UK should find a ready market elsewhere in the world for their production.

    Not saying it will be simple but there will be a whole bunch of UK bureaucrats in the EU with not much else to do.
    Did it ever occurred to you that the Brits might not be able anymore to pay for the goods on these massive trucks? Just wait for the well paid London bankers to move to Europe ... no need to truck their BMW's in future through the tunnel
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackPeter View Post
    Did it ever occurred to you that the Brits might not be able anymore to pay for the goods on these massive trucks? Just wait for the well paid London bankers to move to Europe ... no need to truck their BMW's in future through the tunnel
    Heh, more likely to be cabbages and spring onions than BMWs. And if there is an oversupply what happens to the price?

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by artemis View Post
    Heh, more likely to be cabbages and spring onions than BMWs. And if there is an oversupply what happens to the price?

    automotive industry in the United Kingdom is now best known for premium and sports car marques including Aston Martin, Bentley, Caterham Cars, Daimler, Jaguar, Lagonda, Land Rover, Lotus, McLaren, MG, Mini, Morgan and Rolls-Royce. Volume car manufacturers with a major presence in the UK include Honda, Nissan, Toyota and Vauxhall Motors....

    watch these brands do better in the UK
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  11. #31
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    Andrew Cornell says the worst case Brexit knock-on effect for the global economy and banking industry would be a large-scale retraction of globalisation and a retreat into simplistic nationalism

    http://www.interest.co.nz/opinion/82...nking-industry

    A retreat into simplified nationalism might be a good outcome ......for all long term
    “Just consider that maybe the probability of you being wrong is higher than you think.”

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackPeter View Post
    ... I do know a German baker quite well - and she appears to be not too worried about all the rules you mentioned when she bakes fresh bread. I assume most of these rules are anyway common sense for people who like good food. I acknowledge however that this excludes many British people ...
    I happened to like the steak 'n kidney, Fish 'n chips, mushy peas and Scotch eggs amongst the cuisine when I visited the North of England. I did not like all French cuisine that is for sure - snails and fungal truffles for example. Vive la difference.
    Last edited by Bjauck; 29-06-2016 at 05:28 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackPeter View Post
    Brexit-explained with food.jpg

    Love it - photo with regards from a previous poster (Crackity)
    An excellent photo.

    However, you must admit BP that the Brits do not have all the terrible food.

    Kiwi Bacon !.. Over salted, chemically pumped, watery rubbish...

    Bacon here is to be savoured ... Not sure what, if any regulations are around it's production. :-)))))

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frankenstein View Post
    John Oliver had something to say on those touted 109 pillow regulations:

    "We blew up that frame...the problem is, most have nothing to do with actual pillows".

    For instance: a breakfast cereal that is cut into 'pillow' shaped pieces; a merger between two auto-part companies that included the phrase 'pillow ball joints'; in reference to a pillow shaped foot pump used for inflating an air mattress.

    He goes on to point out that if the UK want to continue trading with Europe (and presumably they do), then they'll have to meet those '109 pillow regulations' anyway.

    https://youtu.be/iAgKHSNqxa8
    I stand corrected on those examples - naive of me to believe such 'factual details' in a propaganda video.
    However the point remains that the perception (regardless of how true it was) of stultifying bureaucracy (and it certainly is expensive and unhelpful to small business) and total lack of democratic accountability was a prime concern of the leave vote - more so than concerns about immigration etc.
    That is important in terms of the direction the government can take with the support of the majority of voters. A majority would favour being in a common market, even with similar rules on freedom of movement etc (more so if many leave voters now have regrets)

    This article is well worth reading: http://www.adamsmith.org/blog/time-for-the-eea-option

    Some key points:
    " Now that we’re getting out the challenge will be to get the best deal possible. I think that is, by a longshot, the EEA Option – membership of the Single Market without membership of the European Union. Our full case for the EEA Option is here, but here are some quick points worth mentioning:

    1. Nevertheless, cutting immigration was not voters’ only concern. A Lord Ashcroft poll of 12,369 voters found that only one third (33%) of Leave voters ranked controlling immigration as their top reason for leaving – that is, 17% of all voters – compared to 49% who said it was “the principle that decisions about the UK should be taken in the UK”.
    2. For many Leave voters it was about having control over immigration, not necessarily reducing numbers. Article 112 of the EEA Agreement allows EEA states to take unilateral action to restrict freedom of movement in the event of “serious economic, societal or environmental difficulties”. This may be enough control to satisfy a majority of the British public, if it was the trade-off for economic stability in other respects. Those people who believe that voters will feel betrayed if immigration does not sharply fall should consider how betrayed those same voters will feel if we have a recession after being promised repeatedly that this was not a risk.
    3. Voters may be surprisingly open to the EEA Option. We commissioned a YouGov poll recently that asked voters whether they would support the EEA Option even if it meant adopting some EU law and keeping freedom of movement, as Norway does. By a two-to-one margin (54% to 25%) they said that they would either strongly support or tend to support this choice. And yes, a single poll needs to be taken with a giant pinch of salt, but it is still indicative that the public wants economic security above all else.
    Last edited by DarkHorse; 29-06-2016 at 07:58 PM.

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  18. #38
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    BREXIT seminar from Betashares - interesting economical analysis worthwhile watching:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uhkj...NExURjQ9In0%3D

    Obviously - it contains as well a Sales pitch for Beta share ETF's, but if you've got time I'd recommend to watch part 1 (probably 15 min) and the Question time towards the end ...
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    Quote Originally Posted by janner View Post
    An excellent photo.

    However, you must admit BP that the Brits do not have all the terrible food.

    Kiwi Bacon !.. Over salted, chemically pumped, watery rubbish...

    Bacon here is to be savoured ... Not sure what, if any regulations are around it's production. :-)))))
    Interesting that the Brits are represented by baked beans. The beans are not native to the UK and bean stews were originally French and made from South American beans. The process was then refined in the USA and brought to the UK. The archetypal brand in the UK is American.

  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by janner View Post
    An excellent photo.

    However, you must admit BP that the Brits do not have all the terrible food.

    Kiwi Bacon !.. Over salted, chemically pumped, watery rubbish...

    Bacon here is to be savoured ... Not sure what, if any regulations are around it's production. :-)))))
    Happy to acknowledge that much of the processed food available here in NZ seems to adhere to similarly low (taste) standards than the food coming from the British islands. As long as it is tasteless, fills the belly and doesn't kill the consumer, it appears to satisfy the NZ expectations for how food is meant to be.

    I always put that down to New Zealand's British roots ... however - this subject probably belongs into a different thread - I don't see a direct link from NZ food quality to the BREXIT ...
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