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Thread: Brexit

  1. #31
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    Andrew Cornell says the worst case Brexit knock-on effect for the global economy and banking industry would be a large-scale retraction of globalisation and a retreat into simplistic nationalism

    http://www.interest.co.nz/opinion/82...nking-industry

    A retreat into simplified nationalism might be a good outcome ......for all long term
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  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackPeter View Post
    ... I do know a German baker quite well - and she appears to be not too worried about all the rules you mentioned when she bakes fresh bread. I assume most of these rules are anyway common sense for people who like good food. I acknowledge however that this excludes many British people ...
    I happened to like the steak 'n kidney, Fish 'n chips, mushy peas and Scotch eggs amongst the cuisine when I visited the North of England. I did not like all French cuisine that is for sure - snails and fungal truffles for example. Vive la difference.
    Last edited by Bjauck; 29-06-2016 at 04:28 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackPeter View Post
    Attachment 8138

    Love it - photo with regards from a previous poster (Crackity)
    An excellent photo.

    However, you must admit BP that the Brits do not have all the terrible food.

    Kiwi Bacon !.. Over salted, chemically pumped, watery rubbish...

    Bacon here is to be savoured ... Not sure what, if any regulations are around it's production. :-)))))

  4. #34
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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frankenstein View Post
    John Oliver had something to say on those touted 109 pillow regulations:

    "We blew up that frame...the problem is, most have nothing to do with actual pillows".

    For instance: a breakfast cereal that is cut into 'pillow' shaped pieces; a merger between two auto-part companies that included the phrase 'pillow ball joints'; in reference to a pillow shaped foot pump used for inflating an air mattress.

    He goes on to point out that if the UK want to continue trading with Europe (and presumably they do), then they'll have to meet those '109 pillow regulations' anyway.

    https://youtu.be/iAgKHSNqxa8
    I stand corrected on those examples - naive of me to believe such 'factual details' in a propaganda video.
    However the point remains that the perception (regardless of how true it was) of stultifying bureaucracy (and it certainly is expensive and unhelpful to small business) and total lack of democratic accountability was a prime concern of the leave vote - more so than concerns about immigration etc.
    That is important in terms of the direction the government can take with the support of the majority of voters. A majority would favour being in a common market, even with similar rules on freedom of movement etc (more so if many leave voters now have regrets)

    This article is well worth reading: http://www.adamsmith.org/blog/time-for-the-eea-option

    Some key points:
    " Now that we’re getting out the challenge will be to get the best deal possible. I think that is, by a longshot, the EEA Option – membership of the Single Market without membership of the European Union. Our full case for the EEA Option is here, but here are some quick points worth mentioning:

    1. Nevertheless, cutting immigration was not voters’ only concern. A Lord Ashcroft poll of 12,369 voters found that only one third (33%) of Leave voters ranked controlling immigration as their top reason for leaving – that is, 17% of all voters – compared to 49% who said it was “the principle that decisions about the UK should be taken in the UK”.
    2. For many Leave voters it was about having control over immigration, not necessarily reducing numbers. Article 112 of the EEA Agreement allows EEA states to take unilateral action to restrict freedom of movement in the event of “serious economic, societal or environmental difficulties”. This may be enough control to satisfy a majority of the British public, if it was the trade-off for economic stability in other respects. Those people who believe that voters will feel betrayed if immigration does not sharply fall should consider how betrayed those same voters will feel if we have a recession after being promised repeatedly that this was not a risk.
    3. Voters may be surprisingly open to the EEA Option. We commissioned a YouGov poll recently that asked voters whether they would support the EEA Option even if it meant adopting some EU law and keeping freedom of movement, as Norway does. By a two-to-one margin (54% to 25%) they said that they would either strongly support or tend to support this choice. And yes, a single poll needs to be taken with a giant pinch of salt, but it is still indicative that the public wants economic security above all else.
    Last edited by DarkHorse; 29-06-2016 at 06:58 PM.

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  8. #38
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    BREXIT seminar from Betashares - interesting economical analysis worthwhile watching:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uhkj...NExURjQ9In0%3D

    Obviously - it contains as well a Sales pitch for Beta share ETF's, but if you've got time I'd recommend to watch part 1 (probably 15 min) and the Question time towards the end ...
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  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by janner View Post
    An excellent photo.

    However, you must admit BP that the Brits do not have all the terrible food.

    Kiwi Bacon !.. Over salted, chemically pumped, watery rubbish...

    Bacon here is to be savoured ... Not sure what, if any regulations are around it's production. :-)))))
    Interesting that the Brits are represented by baked beans. The beans are not native to the UK and bean stews were originally French and made from South American beans. The process was then refined in the USA and brought to the UK. The archetypal brand in the UK is American.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by janner View Post
    An excellent photo.

    However, you must admit BP that the Brits do not have all the terrible food.

    Kiwi Bacon !.. Over salted, chemically pumped, watery rubbish...

    Bacon here is to be savoured ... Not sure what, if any regulations are around it's production. :-)))))
    Happy to acknowledge that much of the processed food available here in NZ seems to adhere to similarly low (taste) standards than the food coming from the British islands. As long as it is tasteless, fills the belly and doesn't kill the consumer, it appears to satisfy the NZ expectations for how food is meant to be.

    I always put that down to New Zealand's British roots ... however - this subject probably belongs into a different thread - I don't see a direct link from NZ food quality to the BREXIT ...
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  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlackPeter View Post
    Happy to acknowledge that much of the processed food available here in NZ seems to adhere to similarly low (taste) standards than the food coming from the British islands. As long as it is tasteless, fills the belly and doesn't kill the consumer, it appears to satisfy the NZ expectations for how food is meant to be.

    I always put that down to New Zealand's British roots ... however - this subject probably belongs into a different thread - I don't see a direct link from NZ food quality to the BREXIT ...
    I prefer typical NZ, British, Irish food to Continental European food. It does not mean I dislike some dishes from other cuisines. It is a matter of taste and upbringing.

    Whilst I did not support a Brexit for the UK. The intransigence and "no exception" stance of the European Union appointees and many of the national leaders surely may do nothing to quell separatism in other countries. What is so bad about a pick-and-mix approach between countries that supposedly embrace cultural pluralism and difference.

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    And now the Irish are creaming it, issuing passports as fast as they can with a huge waiting list. I wonder how much I could get for mine with about eight years to run on it?

  13. #43
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    I saw a thing yesterday which said:

    It's almost like the UK and the US are having a competition to see who can f*** up their country the most. The UK is in the lead, but the US still holds the Trump card!

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sideshow Bob View Post
    I saw a thing yesterday which said:

    It's almost like the UK and the US are having a competition to see who can f*** up their country the most. The UK is in the lead, but the US still holds the Trump card!
    The Poms will come out alright after a year or two of pain. Trump won't win the U.S. election, if he even survives until the election. So it will be Boris or Theresa May, and Hillary. Should be fun from here, downunder.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fungus pudding View Post
    Trump won't win the U.S. election, if he even survives until the election.
    ok, ill go out on a limb here and pick it. Trump will win if clinton runs with warren.

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