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Thread: AIR NZ

  1. #61
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    quote:Originally posted by Paper Tiger

    quote:Originally posted by donner

    Does anyone know about AIR's cargo business?
    NO, we usually travel in the passenger cabin
    My thoughts excactly.

  2. #62
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    hey after the AIR right convert to shares on 10 dec
    the share price for air should fall right??
    because the no of share has increased.....
    let me know if i am wrong

  3. #63
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    yes. Plus an increase in sellers selling their holdings to retrieve their capital.

  4. #64
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    oh ok i guess so
    i was going to buy gullivers but i have change my target to air NZ
    i will get my money ready, whenever the price fall to or close my orginal investment at 1.54 i will buy some more
    i recon its a share worth to hold for long term (or at least til feb next year depends on its half year result)
    thanks donner

  5. #65
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    Air NZ warns 2006 profit could fall 40 per cent


    29.08.05 1.00pm


    By Rachel Pannett


    National carrier Air New Zealand today warned its 2006 earnings could plunge by as much as 40 per cent if sky high oil prices continue.

    "If fuel prices persist at current levels, then the potential exists for the current year performance to be around 40 per cent below the 2005 result," Air NZ chairman John Palmer said.

    The warning came after the company today posted a slightly higher June year net profit of $180 million.

    Today's result was up 8 per cent on the $166 million profit recorded for the same period a year earlier, and bettered analysts' expectations of $161 million. Before unusual items and tax, the profit fell 3 per cent to $235 million, just above an earnings guidance of $220 million issued by the airline in June.

    Outgoing chief executive Ralph Norris put a positive spin on the result, saying that excluding record fuel prices -- which account for around 30 per cent of operating costs -- and the difficult trading environment on the Tasman, the result was among the best in the company's history.

    "I am encouraged that even in these tough conditions we achieved a solid profit, which was underpinned by another year of strong domestic performance and improvements in some key international routes," he said.

    Air NZ shares, 82 per cent owned by the Government after a $885 million rescue package in 2002, last traded down a cent at $1.24.

    Over the past year, shares have fallen 26 per cent against a 20 per cent rise for the benchmark NZSX-50 index. At these levels, the Government is well out of pocket, having paid an average of $1.30 per share for its stake.

    The company declared a final dividend of 2.5 cents a share -- its second in four years -- having signalled last year that it expected to be in a position to pay shareholders between 25 per cent and 35 per cent of net profit after tax from 2005.

    Mr Norris, who leaves the airline today to head Commonwealth Bank in Australia, is credited with nurturing the airline from near bankruptcy following the collapse of its Australian subsidiary Ansett in 2001, to its current solid state.

    Despite the tough trading conditions, revenue rose 3 per cent to $3.6 billion during the year, while gearing improved to 51 per cent.

    Air NZ carried more than 11 million passengers during the year, up by 781,000.

    Mr Norris said the financial and operating targets set for 2006 were challenging in today's environment.

    Roughly 60 per cent of the airline's fuel requirements for 2006 are hedged at US$53 per barrel, against current spot market prices of around US$67. For the first half the hedge position is 70 per cent.

    "As hedges roll off and are replaced by higher priced hedges, the operating cost base will increase, impacting margins," Mr Norris said.

    "There is no doubt that the times ahead will be tough, but we have proven in the past few years that Air NZ has the ability to cope with adversity."

    Air NZ chairman Mr Palmer said the international search for a new chief executive was progressing well.

    Chief financial officer Rob McDonald will step in as acting chief executive in the interim.

    Mr McDonald said that he would not be seeking the role full-time.

    \"The overweening conceit which the greater part of men have of their own abilities [and] their absurd presumption in their own good fortune.\" - <b>Adam Smith</b> - <i>The Wealth of Nations</i>

    The information you have is not the information you want.
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    The information you need is not the information you can obtain.
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  6. #66
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    With one billion in cash and one billion shares thats a $1 so the planes worth 20 cents so we have $1.20 cum div s/price who is holding up AIR the BUY.. [8D]

  7. #67
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    The s/p now equates at the old pre-consolidation price to a rotten 23.6c

  8. #68
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    Marriage made of necessity
    08 April 2006
    By ROELAND VAN DEN BERGH

    A proposed tie-up between Air New Zealand and Qantas on the Tasman is the first step toward resurrecting a failed alliance bid and could be the start of reshaping the Asia-Pacific aviation market.


    Air New Zealand and Qantas are among the most profitable airlines in the world.

    Their home markets are considered safe haven destinations by foreign tourists in times of global unrest.

    But it is the distance from the rest of the world that lies at the heart of the need for two national carriers to come together in the long term.

    As end-of-the-line carriers, reliant on bringing tourists to their home markets along some of the longest routes in the world, they lack the geographic advantage of big competitors like Singapore Airlines and Dubai's Emirates Airline. These competitors operate from natural mid points between the northern and southern hemispheres, providing a constant flow of passengers throughout their networks.

    Consolidation among big airlines in coming years is expected to create a handful of mega carriers.

    Centre for Asia Pacific Aviation Studies director Andrew Miller said Air New Zealand and Qantas would ultimately have to join forces with a global airline like Singapore Airlines to protect their patch or risk being marginalised.

    AdvertisementAdvertisementA trans-Tasman code-share agreement, which is understood to be in the final stages of preparation, is seen as a step toward resurrecting a full alliance proposed three years ago and rejected as anti-competitive by regulators in both countries. While the alliance has since been approved on appeal in Australia, in New Zealand the Commerce Commission's negative decision was upheld by the High Court.

    The alliance would have seen Air New Zealand take control of all services to, from and within New Zealand, and a global code-sharing agreement for the rest, in return for a $550 million investment by Qantas for 22.5 per cent of Air New Zealand.

    Former Air New Zealand managing director Ralph Norris said the commission's decision showed it had failed to grasp the industry's realities.

    Air New Zealand chief executive Rob Fyfe says the market has since developed as the airline had predicted. Emirates Airline has ramped up services to Auckland and Christchurch using large long-haul aircraft and budget airline Virgin Blue has expanded its Pacific Blue offshoot.

    Mr Miller says that from a strategic perspective, an alliance makes sense, but the consumer legislation works against consolidation of the two airlines, encouraging them to seek other ways to work together.

    The Tasman code-share could be announced later this month. The Air New Zealand board next meets on April 26.

    It will then need to be signed off by the transport minister, a process that can take another three months.

    A code-share agreement is exempt from Commerce Commission approval and could allow the airlines to show that there is sufficient competition to keep them honest, before renewing their push for a broader alliance.

    The question is whether the Government will risk a public backlash by allowing the commission, as an independent arbitrator, to be sidelined.

    The Tasman is one of the most competitive stretches of sky in the world, fought over by about a dozen airlines, creating massive overcapacity which has slashed fares and profits.

    Most are foreign carriers who tack a flight to New Zealand on to their long-haul services to Australia. They offer full service on large planes at budget prices to avoid having $300 million aircraft sitting idle for the day in Australia.

    But for Qantas, and Air New Zealand in particular, the Tasman is a crucial part of their networks and feeds their profitable domestic services.

    Both are suffering tens of millions of dollars in losses a year on the route that a code-share is likely only to return to break-even.

    Mr Fyfe told a transport conference in Sydney this week that massive overcapacity on the Tasman must be tackled head-on
    \"The overweening conceit which the greater part of men have of their own abilities [and] their absurd presumption in their own good fortune.\" - <b>Adam Smith</b> - <i>The Wealth of Nations</i>

    The information you have is not the information you want.
    The information you want is not the information you need.
    The information you need is not the information you can obtain.
    The informaton you can obtain costs more than you want to pay.

  9. #69
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    WE have read that so rmbbrave what are you SAYING.. [8D]

  10. #70
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    This may or may not be good news depending on a number of conditions each of which has an unknown probability of being meet.

    The SP may or my not go up depending on an even greater number of factors.

    Draw your own conclusions Bricks.
    \"The overweening conceit which the greater part of men have of their own abilities [and] their absurd presumption in their own good fortune.\" - <b>Adam Smith</b> - <i>The Wealth of Nations</i>

    The information you have is not the information you want.
    The information you want is not the information you need.
    The information you need is not the information you can obtain.
    The informaton you can obtain costs more than you want to pay.

  11. #71
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    quote:Originally posted by rmbbrave

    This may or may not be good news depending on a number of conditions each of which has an unknown probability of being meet.

    The SP may or my not go up depending on an even greater number of factors.

    Draw your own conclusions Bricks.
    INCONCLUSION a each way BET.. WIN or PLACE.. [8D]

  12. #72
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    There seem to be a whole raft of posts gone missing between 8/9/2005 & 8/4/2006.

  13. #73
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    Think that this is another thread that has been recently resurrected. Try:

    http://www.sharetrader.co.nz/topic.a...chTerms=air,nz


  14. #74
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    Quite right Bob, thanks.

  15. #75
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    WELL BRICKS has sold out and now off on a 5 month World Wide tour First stop USA Florida,, Would like to thank all the KIWI knockers on this stock AIR and the hard times you handed out but being BIG hearted I will forget you until next time BRICKS , says you all have a GOOD DAY.. [8D]

  16. #76
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    quote:Originally posted by BRICKS

    WELL BRICKS has sold out and now off on a 5 month World Wide tour First stop USA Florida,, Would like to thank all the KIWI knockers on this stock AIR and the hard times you handed out but being BIG hearted I will forget you until next time BRICKS , says you all have a GOOD DAY.. [8D]
    FORGOT today is BRICKS birthday ?? ,,[8D]

  17. #77
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    More details on the 'proposed' code-share.



    Number 1 - May 1, 2006

    Qantas - Air New Zealand Code Share

    On 12 April 2006, Qantas and Air NZ announced a plan to "code-share" on the Tasman. This alert explains what the code share is and what the Government should do.

    What is a code-share?

    Usually a code-share is an arrangement to allow one airline to show its code or flight number on another airline's flight, on a route where they do not compete. For example, Air New Zealand code shares with United Airlines on some trans Tasman flights where they are never likely to compete. The proposed code-share is for routes where Qantas and Air NZ are by far the dominant competitors. That is not normal at all.

    What are Air NZ and Qantas proposing?

    Air NZ and Qantas want to create a cartel. That is, they want to collude on prices and services for all routes between Australia and New Zealand. They also want to be able to collude on payments to travel agents and a range of other matters. They will set up a joint committee between the two airlines to make decisions on what they will jointly offer customers. They will not compete and the deliberations of the joint committee will not be scrutinised.

    Didn't they try this once before?

    In 2003 Qantas and Air NZ proposed an "alliance" that would have allowed extensive collusion in many markets. It was rejected by the Commerce Commission as highly detrimental to New Zealand. It was rejected by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) as detrimental to Australia. On appeal, the High Court upheld the Commerce Commission's decision.

    So what's different this time?

    As far as consumers are concerned, not much. The worst elements of the former proposal remain - collusion on prices and schedules on one of New Zealand's most important markets. Although the agreement does not allow the cartel committee to set prices and schedules for other markets, there is nothing to prevent them from making unilateral decisions not to challenge a 'friendly party' on domestic routes.

    Won't the Commerce Commission put a stop to it?

    This time, the Commerce Commission may not get a say. There is an anachronistic exemption from the Commerce Act to allow the Minister for Transport to approve code shares. It was never envisaged that this would extend to a highly anti-competitive cartel, but that exemption exists and it is being used in that way.
    There is no such exemption in Australia, so (as in most countries) it will go to the competition regulator. But the ACCC is under no obligation to take the interests of Kiwis into account.

    Should the Minister of Transport make the decision?

    Most developed countries recognise that when influential commercial interests seek to collude, it is better to have an independent and expert commission examine the impacts on consumers. When the Government owns the airline, it is even more difficult for the Minister to be independent and be seen to be independent.

    What should the Government do?

    If this code-share really is good for New Zealand as the proponents say, why not let that point be tested openly and rigorously?
    The Government should do two things:
    " Refer the current application to the Commerce Commission for a transparent investigation and advice;
    " Enact legislation to get rid of the exemption from the Commerce Act for anti-competitive code shares.

    What can I do?

    Write to the Minister of Transport, the Minister of Commerce, and your local MP, and tell them you want New Zealand's interests examined by the Commerce Commission. Airlines are making a case to pursue their commercial interests. Be sceptical of claims about the potential benefits of the cartel and assurances that all will be well.

    Toddy

  18. #78
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    All is not well at AIR. Rumours aired on TV last night that Rob Fyfe is on the way out and a furious john Palmer inviting discontented or demoralised staff to get out.

  19. #79
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    What chanel was that on Skol and can you tell us more?

    quote:Originally posted by Skol

    All is not well at AIR. Rumours aired on TV last night that Rob Fyfe is on the way out and a furious john Palmer inviting discontented or demoralised staff to get out.

  20. #80
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    Channel 1 if I remember correctly. There was also some kind of document made public with an HR consultant stating that such inflammatory invective invites subversiveness. Very interesting.

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