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  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by peat View Post
    newborns should day-trade
    without a doubt.
    In for a penny or in for a pound?

  2. #32
    Ignorant. Just ignorant.
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    Another 2 cents worth, this time for justakiwi.

    You're at a stage where you have to weigh returns against risk. You don't have as much time as JamesW's newborn to recover from bad stuff happening, so you have to be more cautious than you would have had to be 20 years ago. So in your shoes I'd be looking at a tilt toward property and infrastructure, and thinking about bland "global" vehicles.

    But that doesn't mean you have to be entirely serious all of the time. Each year I throw caution to the winds and splurge $500 on whatever's cheapest on the NZX on April Fools Day.

    A couple have worked out really well, some have gone nowhere, and some have gone right down the toilet. But it's been interesting and instructive to watch. and by isolating the rabid speculation it helps prevent me from doing stupid, impulsive things with "real" money.

    Good luck, and occasionally keep us posted on what you decide to do

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTM 3442 View Post
    Each year I throw caution to the winds and splurge $500 on whatever's cheapest on the NZX on April Fools Day.
    That is so random!
    But hey if BP's thread on analyst estimates is anything to go by you've got a better chance!
    For clarity, nothing I say is advice....

  4. #34
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    If you're looking to invest over many decades (in the case of a newborn), here are some thoughts:

    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/buffe...162715418.html

    Takeaway: never bet against America

    If there's one thing to learn from Buffett's latest investments, it's that investors should look at the long-term view of markets and remain bullish on the prospects for the U.S. economy, regardless of growing risks in the short term. The country has survived multiple recessions and still provided stellar returns to investors who did not panic. In an interview with CNBC in 2017, Buffet said:



    "American businesses - and consequently a basket of stocks - is virtually certain to be worth far more in the years ahead. The years ahead will occasionally deliver major market declines, even panics, that will affect virtually all stocks. Widespread fear is your friend as an investor because it serves up bargain purchases. For 240 years, it's been a terrible mistake to bet against America and now is no time to start."

    So when you rush to your Kiwi Saver and choose the various actively managed funds, which one should you pick?

  5. #35
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    Hi GMT

    Thanks for the reply, sorry it been a while since starting this post.

    Update

    I have opened an account for my daughter with sharesies.

    Glad I was busy with work and only just got around to signing up before the covid announcement.

    My daughter had 1000 in her account so I transferred it across and invested in one fund and one company.

    500 into smart shares NZX50 FNZ
    500 into ryman healthcare

    I bought both of these not quite at the bottom, on the way up but they are both ahead to date.

    I have also set up an auto invest each week into FNZ & USF

    $25 per week.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by SBQ View Post
    If you're looking to invest over many decades (in the case of a newborn), here are some thoughts:

    https://finance.yahoo.com/news/buffe...162715418.html

    Takeaway: never bet against America

    If there's one thing to learn from Buffett's latest investments, it's that investors should look at the long-term view of markets and remain bullish on the prospects for the U.S. economy, regardless of growing risks in the short term. The country has survived multiple recessions and still provided stellar returns to investors who did not panic. In an interview with CNBC in 2017, Buffet said:



    "American businesses - and consequently a basket of stocks - is virtually certain to be worth far more in the years ahead. The years ahead will occasionally deliver major market declines, even panics, that will affect virtually all stocks. Widespread fear is your friend as an investor because it serves up bargain purchases. For 240 years, it's been a terrible mistake to bet against America and now is no time to start."

    So when you rush to your Kiwi Saver and choose the various actively managed funds, which one should you pick?
    The one that is longest on stocks

  7. #37
    Ignorant. Just ignorant.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTM 3442 View Post
    Another 2 cents worth, this time for justakiwi.

    You're at a stage where you have to weigh returns against risk. You don't have as much time as JamesW's newborn to recover from bad stuff happening, so you have to be more cautious than you would have had to be 20 years ago. So in your shoes I'd be looking at a tilt toward property and infrastructure, and thinking about bland "global" vehicles.

    But that doesn't mean you have to be entirely serious all of the time. Each year I throw caution to the winds and splurge $500 on whatever's cheapest on the NZX on April Fools Day.

    A couple have worked out really well, some have gone nowhere, and some have gone right down the toilet. But it's been interesting and instructive to watch. and by isolating the rabid speculation it helps prevent me from doing stupid, impulsive things with "real" money.

    Good luck, and occasionally keep us posted on what you decide to do

    This year it turns out to be CRP - Chatham Rise * Phosphate.

    No.

    This year I'm having a year off.

  8. #38
    Advanced Member BIRMANBOY's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong in saving $500 lol.
    Quote Originally Posted by GTM 3442 View Post
    This year it turns out to be CRP - Chatham Rise * Phosphate.

    No.

    This year I'm having a year off.
    www.dividendyield.co.nz
    Conservative Investing and dividend producers...get rich slowly!
    https://www.facebook.com/dividendyieldnz

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiora View Post
    The one that is longest on stocks
    The one that has managed share investments the longest? If so, that hold true to a certain point. Long ago in the 90s I had investments in Templeton Funds because of John Templeton's approach to value investments. Fortunately I never stayed long and moved it over to Berkshire and since then, that was the most wise move as Buffet has proved the vast majority of these managed funds underperform the index.

    Find me a Kiwi Saver fund that adopts the same ethics and approach to investing as Berkshire does? Here's one to offer: How about not charging ANY management fees if the fund does worse than what the person could of done, by simply buying the market index return?

  10. #40
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    Longest?
    Mainly buying & hold,little selling .more buying over time
    "Having a “long” position in a security means that you own the security. ... A "short" position is generally the sale of a stock you do not own. Investors who sell short believe the price of the stock will decrease in value. If the price drops, you can buy the stock at the lower price and make a profit."
    Yeah same with Templeton. Moved on

  11. #41
    Member NOCASH's Avatar
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    I have a question for you all, how much $ is enough to think of diversifying, spreading risk.

    My thought is $100k, I have been telling my friends if you have $5k,10k,15k to invest in the share market, pick one company and buy.
    Bye Bye BUy

  12. #42
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    Totally disagree. Even with only $5000 invested, diversification is still important. I have just under that figure and hold 1 fund and 6 companies. No plans to add any more, but what I have, gives me global and sector spread, the value of which is currently very apparent.

    Quote Originally Posted by NOCASH View Post
    I have a question for you all, how much $ is enough to think of diversifying, spreading risk.

    My thought is $100k, I have been telling my friends if you have $5k,10k,15k to invest in the share market, pick one company and buy.

  13. #43
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    I disagree also. Too many "great" picks have fallen by the wayside over the years, others have survived but failed to achieve the heights forecast by their supporters. The principle of diversification has been well demonstrated over the years - I would suggest at least 2 stocks in unrelated sectors for $5k, 3 or 4 for $10k of $15k. I won't bore you with a list of the great picks I've made in over 50 years of investing but CBL heads the list!

  14. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by NOCASH View Post
    I have a question for you all, how much $ is enough to think of diversifying, spreading risk.

    My thought is $100k, I have been telling my friends if you have $5k,10k,15k to invest in the share market, pick one company and buy.
    Before you even think about investing in ANY stock; you better be sure you know the business inside and out. This is the problem with active fund managers in that they are pretty much clueless on the shares they buy for their clients because they simply, don't spend (or know where to look or how) the time doing real research on the business. So if it's that difficult for these so called expert investors, what chance do you have? Perhaps a lot more as many investors have done very well just by understanding the business model without a bother of understanding fundamentals or technical analysis charts blah blah etc.

    The amount to invest where diversification becomes an issue doesn't really matter until you're working with super large amounts like $1M + Why? Because it all has to do with the investor's appetite for risk. To lose $5K is not so bad, but to lose $500K or $1M is a horse of a different colour. Generally those with significant sums want to be sure to get a 'high' probable return on the amount invested - like 5%. But to make 5% on something like $5K is kinda like a waste of time. I got this impressed at a local Chch investment seminar where Jarden Investments was doing a presentation. They were "Looking for clients with liquid assets in excess of $500K" because of the key reason being, to make the returns 'decent' enough for the investor. To the investor that puts up $5K, well, they may be better at the casino because buying stocks, no matter how well diversified it may be, it's kinda a waste of time. Sure you got to start somewhere but then again, look at how difficult it is to buy a house in Auckland? No pity to those that can't afford to get in one. The same applies to share investments IF you INTEND this to be the vehicle for your retirement.

  15. #45
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    Wow. your arrogance is really showing this time.

    Quote Originally Posted by SBQ View Post
    .... But to make 5% on something like $5K is kinda like a waste of time......
    Not to me it’s not. 5% is a hell of a lot better than I can get from the bank.

    To the investor that puts up $5K, well, they may be better at the casino because buying stocks, no matter how well diversified it may be, it's kinda a waste of time......
    Absolute BS.

    The same applies to share investments IF you INTEND this to be the vehicle for your retirement.
    Again, absolute BS.

    This is the kind of attitude that puts beginners off and makes them feel stupid for even considering investing. Is this the same advice you would give your child or grandchild if they had $5000 saved and wanted to get started in the share market? I sure hope not.

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