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Thread: Coronavirus

  1. #761
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    At last it looks as if we will have a really effective treatment thats affordable-
    A double blind placebo controlled phase 2 trial shows-


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    Inhaled interferon beta lowered the risk for developing severe infection and improved the likelihood of recovery from COVID-19 compared with placebo, according to early data released by Synairgen.

    The company released early results from its double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, which enrolled 101 patients with COVID-19 at nine sites in the United Kingdom from March 30 to May 27. Patients in the hospital setting were randomly assigned to treatment with inhaled interferon beta (SNG001, Synairgen) or placebo. Patient groups were evenly matched, with a mean age of about 57 years and COVID-19 symptoms prior to enrollment for about 9 days.



    The positive findings were released in a press release by the company and have not yet been published.

    According to the early results, the odds of developing severe COVID-19 infection requiring ventilation or resulting in death during the treatment period, from day 1 to day 16, was reduced by 79% for patients receiving inhaled interferon beta compared with placebo (OR = 0.21; 95% CI, 0.04-0.97; P = .046). Patients receiving inhaled interferon beta were more than twice as likely to recover from COVID-19 infection during the treatment period compared with the placebo group (HR = 2.19; 95% CI, 1.03-4.69; P = .043), according to the release. Further, patients receiving inhaled interferon beta appeared to be more than twice as likely to have recovered by the end of the treatment period (HR = 2.6; 95% CI, 0.95-7.07; P = .062). By day 28, patients receiving inhaled interferon beta had significantly better odds of recovery (OR = 3.86; 95% CI, 1.27-11.75; P = .017), according to the release.

    imho-It should not take long for a phase 3 trial to commence and then maybe a month for the trial to be completed.
    Beta-interferon would cost around $100 a day and has been used by injection for many years.
    Inhalation route I am not familiar with but should be safer and better targeted and expect no delays in its approval .
    Last edited by fish; 23-07-2020 at 08:11 PM.

  2. #762
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    Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2

    Media Contact

    Gina Kirchweger
    gina@lji.org
    858-752-6640

    Researchers caution: It is too soon to say whether pre-existing immune cell memory affects COVID-19 clinical outcomes

    LA JOLLA INSTITUTE FOR IMMUNOLOGY

    LA JOLLA–Your immune system’s “memory” T cells keep track of the viruses they have seen before. This immune cell memory gives the cells a headstart in recognizing and fighting off repeat invaders.

    Now, a new study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) shows that memory helper T cells that recognize common cold coronaviruses also recognize matching sites on SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_relea...-etc080320.php
    https://science.sciencemag.org/conte...cience.abd3871
    Last edited by blackcap; 08-08-2020 at 10:34 AM.

  3. #763
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackcap View Post
    Exposure to common cold coronaviruses can teach the immune system to recognize SARS-CoV-2

    Media Contact

    Gina Kirchweger
    gina@lji.org
    858-752-6640

    Researchers caution: It is too soon to say whether pre-existing immune cell memory affects COVID-19 clinical outcomes

    LA JOLLA INSTITUTE FOR IMMUNOLOGY

    LA JOLLA–Your immune system’s “memory” T cells keep track of the viruses they have seen before. This immune cell memory gives the cells a headstart in recognizing and fighting off repeat invaders.

    Now, a new study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) shows that memory helper T cells that recognize common cold coronaviruses also recognize matching sites on SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

    https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_relea...-etc080320.php
    https://science.sciencemag.org/conte...cience.abd3871
    Given just about everyone has had the common cold it doesn't seem to be working so well.

  4. #764
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    Quote Originally Posted by dobby41 View Post
    Given just about everyone has had the common cold it doesn't seem to be working so well.
    Seems to be working very well indeed. The CFR is dropping by the week, at the conclusion of this madness it will be about as deadly as the common flu. IFR is even lower and falling as well. A lot of hype about nothing in the end.

  5. #765
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackcap View Post
    Seems to be working very well indeed. The CFR is dropping by the week, at the conclusion of this madness it will be about as deadly as the common flu. IFR is even lower and falling as well. A lot of hype about nothing in the end.
    Thats a bit opinionated and misinterpretation of what is actually happening .

  6. #766
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    Quote Originally Posted by fish View Post
    Thats a bit opinionated and misinterpretation of what is actually happening .
    You cannot argue that as time goes on the CFR is lowering by the week. The rest is opinion granted but our techniques for treating the virus at all stages is improving markedly and that should be the focus rather than a vaccine. As covid-19 is an aerosol type of viruses is difficult at best to find a suitable vaccine as they tend to mutate quickly.

  7. #767
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackcap View Post
    You cannot argue that as time goes on the CFR is lowering by the week. The rest is opinion granted but our techniques for treating the virus at all stages is improving markedly and that should be the focus rather than a vaccine. As covid-19 is an aerosol type of viruses is difficult at best to find a suitable vaccine as they tend to mutate quickly.
    Unfortunately for most of the World there appears to be no lowering of the CFR . Granted there have been improvements in ICU management which appears to be reducing CFR rates but on a world scale is not as dramatic as you suggest. Reports of reductions in CFR probably have more to do with testing and detecting milder cases.
    Vaccination most probably will be effective at reducing CFR .
    Ivermectin a drug approved for other infections (not viral) is relatively safe and hopefully may result in a massive reduction in CFR .
    The focus need to remain on both vaccination and treatment .

  8. #768
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    Human faces speak more than statistics-
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/graph...h-coronavirus/

  9. #769
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    That bell curve in Sweden starting to look mighty enticing now.

  10. #770
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackcap View Post
    That bell curve in Sweden starting to look mighty enticing now.
    Not with the deaths that they had it isn't.

  11. #771
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    Quote Originally Posted by dobby41 View Post
    Not with the deaths that they had it isn't.
    Most of their deaths were in elderly homes, who would likely have died anyway. Sweden took the right approach, even the Herald had an article the other day saying that or alluding to that it might have been the right approach. Knock me over with a barge pole. They did not have to go through 7 weeks of lockdown and now another how many weeks of lockdown will it be for an inevitable country wide transmission long term.

  12. #772
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackcap View Post
    Most of their deaths were in elderly homes, who would likely have died anyway. Sweden took the right approach, even the Herald had an article the other day saying that or alluding to that it might have been the right approach. Knock me over with a barge pole. They did not have to go through 7 weeks of lockdown and now another how many weeks of lockdown will it be for an inevitable country wide transmission long term.
    The lockdown didn't work the first time, so I'm not sure why it would a second time. The shift of strategy to eradication simply didn't work. Perhaps time to try something different, as you've indicated.

  13. #773
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    Quote Originally Posted by blackcap View Post
    Most of their deaths were in elderly homes, who would likely have died anyway..
    For an otherwise astute member, it’s these callous statements that makes me sick and wish I could unread a post. Are you really so inert and detached from any sense of basic humanity, saying essentially that if they’re going to die anyway then what’s wrong with hastening it with a Killer virus? Have you no sensibility?

  14. #774
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baa_Baa View Post
    For an otherwise astute member, it’s these callous statements that makes me sick and wish I could unread a post. Are you really so inert and detached from any sense of basic humanity, saying essentially that if they’re going to die anyway then what’s wrong with hastening it with a Killer virus? Have you no sensibility?
    Nothing callous about it, rather just stating facts. Every year x amounts of elderly die of the flu too. What Sweden did was pragmatic and allowed for a certain amount of people to die but allowing the majority to live life as per normal. Just like what we do in NZ with the road toll, we allow for x amounts of deaths so that the country can function normally. We also do that with funding for pharma. People are bagging Sweden with their high fatality rate eg mentioning the 500 people per million but that is not the whole story. Their death rates are falling by the week and are very low now. Their experiment may have payed off. What I probably should have said on reflection was that those that died were in the cohort of age that were at high risk irrespective of where they were globally.I can see how my initial statement may have been seen as callous. I have a friend in The Netherlands who died from covid (or with it as it happens) and I really feel for the family many of whom are friends.

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    If “allowing a certain amount of people to die” ever becomes “normal” in my country (or anywhere else for that matter) I don’t want to be part of the human race anymore. I am disgusted by your comments and by the negativity I have been hearing here and elsewhere, all freaking day. If this is what we have come to, we don’t deserve to occupy this planet we call Earth. We have become an abomination. I am angered and saddened by the sheer selfishness of so many Kiwis today. I have 30 residents on lockdown today at work and not one of them is complaining about covid, the government or the lockdown. They might be old, and according to you, dispensable, but they are so much wiser than you and all the other wingers will ever be. Contrary to what you believe, they do not deserve to be sacrificed

    Quote Originally Posted by blackcap View Post
    Nothing callous about it, rather just stating facts. Every year x amounts of elderly die of the flu too. What Sweden did was pragmatic and allowed for a certain amount of people to die but allowing the majority to live life as per normal. Just like what we do in NZ with the road toll, we allow for x amounts of deaths so that the country can function normally. We also do that with funding for pharma. People are bagging Sweden with their high fatality rate eg mentioning the 500 people per million but that is not the whole story. Their death rates are falling by the week and are very low now. Their experiment may have payed off. What I probably should have said on reflection was that those that died were in the cohort of age that were at high risk irrespective of where they were globally.I can see how my initial statement may have been seen as callous. I have a friend in The Netherlands who died from covid (or with it as it happens) and I really feel for the family many of whom are friends.

  16. #776
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    Quote Originally Posted by justakiwi View Post
    If “allowing a certain amount of people to die” ever becomes “normal” in my country ;:
    Well sorry to burst your bubble, but it already has been for a long time... as per my examples. People are sacrificed for economic benefits daily. That simple really. Wish I could break it to you gently but that is cold reality.

    And for what its worth, I really do not want to sacrifice old people. I like old people, I will be voting NO to the Euthanasea bill as I believe old vulnerable people will be a target.

    But I am also a pragmatist and in certain situations like this one think it is better for NZ and our future for all people if we let covid in rather than these endless lockups, disruptions to business, peoples lives, which will cause untold more damage in the many years to come be it economic, health, mental whatever you name it.
    Last edited by blackcap; Yesterday at 08:21 PM.

  17. #777
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    @justakiwi I think we are wasting our time with this lost soul. So called pragmatist has no sense of humanity, No caring or consideration. Is happy to see people die for the sake of material gains. Sickening, it makes me so sad that some people put circumstances before purpose. Makes me ill thinking about it. Blackcap you have lived up to your handle, a black cap.

  18. #778
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    Originally Posted by justakiwi
    If “allowing a certain amount of people to die” ever becomes “normal” in my country ;:
    My concern is global population has grown like a cancer; I just checked 7.8 Billion. That's a massive # and from what I gather, even by the United Nations reasoning for such a high figure is due to a lack of real wars and diseases in the past century. Breakthroughs in medical and science has made people live longer. Even with this COVID19, we're approaching only 750,000 deaths out of 20 million (noted) infections. That's not gonna cut it. We'll be 10 billion in like the next 10 or 20 years.

    The bigger concern is without more advancement in GMO, or better ways to produce food, we're going to start to see 'food wars' in developing nations. Then with such a massive population, there's going to be an impact on the global climate change ; more natural disasters, etc. I believe in some way or another, more deaths will happen from over population.

  19. #779
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zaphod View Post
    The lockdown didn't work the first time, so I'm not sure why it would a second time. The shift of strategy to eradication simply didn't work. Perhaps time to try something different, as you've indicated.
    The lockdown worked.
    No new community cases for over 100 days .
    Quarantine was inadequate-new cases arriving daily and many released into the community without testing .
    It was inevitable that the community would be reseeded with corvid-19 .
    5 million lives have now been risked because of political stupidity .

  20. #780
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    It’s not the fact that it happens, that bothers me the most. It’s the fact that you (and others) think it’s acceptable.

    I can’t do this anymore. I will be 60 in a couple of weeks. Life is too short to waste time here, getting sucked back into pointless discussions with selfish, self centred people who have lost the ability to care about others or demonstrate compassion.

    Before I go, to those of you who have supported me, helped me learn about investing, and given me advice and encouragement along the way - thank you. I have learned a great deal and have greatly appreciated your wisdom and non-judgmental acceptance of me. You are the ST “good guys” and I have really enjoyed your company. If any of you would like to stay in touch PM me and I’ll give you my email address.

    For my well-being and sanity - I am out.


    Quote Originally Posted by blackcap View Post
    Well sorry to burst your bubble, but it already has been for a long time... as per my examples. People are sacrificed for economic benefits daily. That simple really. Wish I could break it to you gently but that is cold reality.

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