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  1. #1
    Legend peat's Avatar
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    Default VCT080.NZ - VCT 15/06/22 5.70% Vector Limited Bonds

    VCT080.NZ - VCT 15/06/22 5.70% Vector Limited Bonds

    These are capital bonds and so... they don't actually have to pay you back for 'kin ages. maybe never, not sure.
    But! there is some liquidity on market and the reset every 5 years and they will consider buying them off you or selling them on your behalf at that time.
    So if you are a true bond investor they could be useful.
    Better yield than some other bonds and a pretty highly stable company.

    But recently the've got cheaper (better yield) and I'm wondering if that's a part of the corona era or what?
    VCT080.JPG
    For clarity, nothing I say is advice....

  2. #2
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    I think a lot of people want out of everything at the moment

  3. #3
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    I'm happy to hold onto mine

  4. #4
    Ignorant. Just ignorant.
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    There's the same spike in yield across a whole lot of the NZDX. PFI, IFT, CNU SUM included. I think we're seeing the dreaded "flight to quality" - after all, there's a corresponding dip on GOV390 and GOV410. . .

  5. #5
    Legend peat's Avatar
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    thanks GTM
    yes I can see it also in SUM010 except its even worse and they are now available around par.


    Attachment 11163

    So the money thinks Vector is safer than SUM which is reasonable, but shows how SUM is now considered to have some chance of failure I guess.
    I wouldn't have thought so myself but stranger things have happened.
    Last edited by peat; 28-03-2020 at 02:10 AM.
    For clarity, nothing I say is advice....

  6. #6
    Legend peat's Avatar
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    does anybody know if the reset happening next year will use the same margin ?
    For clarity, nothing I say is advice....

  7. #7
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    The maturity date is listed as July next year, so I'm expecting repayment then, but if they were rolled over I would expect the same interest rate calculations as below to apply, which are quite good as far as I'm concerned.
    I admit I haven't read through the offer document since applying for them initially.

    The Adjusted Interest Rate is the aggregate of:
    (a) the Swap Rate at or about 3.00pm on 14 June 2017; plus
    (b) the Issue Margin for the prior Bond Period (being an Issue
    Margin of 2.95 per cent per annum); plus
    (c) the Specified Margin (being 1.00 per cent per annum).
    As at 9.00am on 28 April 2017, the Swap Rate was 2.90 per
    cent. By way of illustrative example only, if the Adjusted Interest
    Rate was being determined at that time, the calculation set out
    above would give an Adjusted Interest Rate of 6.85 per cent per
    annum. The Swap Rate will fluctuate between the date of these
    explanatory notes and 14 June 2017.

  8. #8
    Legend peat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grimy View Post
    The maturity date is listed as July next year, so I'm expecting repayment then, but if they were rolled over I would expect the same interest rate calculations as below to apply, which are quite good as far as I'm concerned.
    I admit I haven't read through the offer document since applying for them initially.

    The Adjusted Interest Rate is the aggregate of:
    (a) the Swap Rate at or about 3.00pm on 14 June 2017; plus
    (b) the Issue Margin for the prior Bond Period (being an Issue
    Margin of 2.95 per cent per annum); plus
    (c) the Specified Margin (being 1.00 per cent per annum).
    As at 9.00am on 28 April 2017, the Swap Rate was 2.90 per
    cent. By way of illustrative example only, if the Adjusted Interest
    Rate was being determined at that time, the calculation set out
    above would give an Adjusted Interest Rate of 6.85 per cent per
    annum. The Swap Rate will fluctuate between the date of these
    explanatory notes and 14 June 2017.
    thanks for responding Grimy

    my understanding of these bonds is that they are capital bonds and don't necessarily ever get repaid or at least they are never obliged to be repaid. (note to self to check on redeemability)

    if that is the case then there will be a new reset notice prior to 15/5/22 which will advise the terms of the new period (presumably another five years).

    If the method from your example stays the same the new rate would be the 5 year Swap rate(SR)+ the Issue Margin (IM) + the Specified Margin (SM)
    I guess ultimately the question is of the IM and the SM which of these would the company change because if they stay the same the new rate could be quite attractive even if you had paid more than par by purchasing on market.
    Complex sums tho.

    Edit
    N.B they may be redeemed at each notice period. Note however that unlike Mercury's capital bonds (2049) these have no stated redemption date, so they may continue.
    If they do I now think both the figures set for the IM and SM will be altered. Its their bond, they can do what they want. and you then choose to accept or offer for resale under their managed facility. Or of course sell them on market.
    Last edited by peat; 22-04-2021 at 12:29 PM.
    For clarity, nothing I say is advice....

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