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  1. #1
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    Default Developments on CoVid-19 vaccines.............

    Still a long way to go but it got to start somehow https://www.manmonthly.com.au/news/c...d-19-vaccines/

  2. #2
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    An interim solution perhaps........ https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/hea...sm-but-caution

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    FEAR n GREED JBmurc's Avatar
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    This is an analysis based on current knowledge, not from any published study (yet), but based on everything we know so far, we believe the vast majority of people dying from the coronavirus have one or more of the following things in common:

    #1) Chronic zinc deficiency, often stemming from over-consumption of processed foods that lack minerals

    #2) Hypertension (high blood pressure)

    3) Taking prescription medications (specifically, high blood pressure meds)

    https://www.newstarget.com/2020-03-3...in-common.html
    People don't have ideas, ideas have people

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    Newstarget? Mike Adams? No, just, no. Take one look at the front page of that website and you'll see headlines like:

    "FDA aggressively attacking colloidal silver products to clear the way for a Big Pharma coronavirus VACCINE (that will probably kill 100,000 Americans all by itself)"
    "CDC trying to get people killed by coronavirus, still saying masks don’t work"
    "How is the Pentagon handling the coronavirus pandemic? (The answer may shock you)"

    If you want to read that BS, please don tinfoil headwear of your choice and go for it.

  5. #5

  6. #6
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    In Iceland 1/2 show symptoms
    https://edition.cnn.com/2020/04/01/e...ntl/index.html
    In China,elsewhere as well its only 1/4(sometimes 1/8?)
    https://www.sciencealert.com/here-s-...thout-symptoms

    Whats the difference?
    Chinese less susceptible to the virus?
    Icelanders more susceptible?

    OR different mutations of virus?
    Genome testing shows slight shift in genomes from European/USA/Asian (New Zealand)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiora View Post
    OR different mutations of virus?
    Genome testing shows slight shift in genomes from European/USA/Asian (New Zealand)
    https://nextstrain.org

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiora View Post
    In Iceland 1/2 show symptoms
    https://edition.cnn.com/2020/04/01/e...ntl/index.html
    In China,elsewhere as well its only 1/4(sometimes 1/8?)
    https://www.sciencealert.com/here-s-...thout-symptoms

    Whats the difference?
    Chinese less susceptible to the virus?
    Icelanders more susceptible?

    OR different mutations of virus?
    Genome testing shows slight shift in genomes from European/USA/Asian (New Zealand)
    Totally different approach and politics and politicians kept totally out of the decision making. Here is a good article about it from the Daily Telegraph in the UK a couple of days ago:

    How Iceland turned into the world's biggest study of Covid-19 - and what it's teaching us
    Mass testing has avoided lockdowns - but does this tiny island nation have all the answers?
    ByThor Fanndal REYKJAVIK4 April 2020 • 2:09pm
    Premium

    At the latest count 22,195 people had been tested - amounting to six per cent of the population. 1,364 have tested positive and four people have died.



    You would be forgiven for thinking the tiny island nation of Iceland is being ravaged by coronavirus.
    Raw data shows the highest proportion of confirmed cases anywhere in the world - 1,300 among a population of 365,000.
    But step outside into the bright spring sunshine and you won't see ghostly quiet streets and shuttered businesses like in Italy and Spain.
    Instead the cafes, pubs and shops are doing a gentle trade, while schools remain open and travel is unhindered - even tourists are welcomed, the ones that manage to book a flight.
    The reason behind the high numbers is the most aggressive Covid-19 testing regime anywhere in the world.
    In proportion to population, Iceland has now screened five times as many as in South Korea - the poster country for a national Covid response - and 30 times as many as the UK has managed.
    At the latest count 22,195 people had been tested - amounting to six per cent of the population. 1,364 have tested positive and four people have died.
    With the results authorities are able to pursue aggressive quarantines for those with a higher statistical chance of infection, to slow the spread without a draconian nationwide shutdown.
    Across the world, countries tend to have settled into two camps in fighting the virus: containment or mitigation, Thorolfur Gudnason, the government's chief epidemiologist, tells The Telegraph.
    "It's like you would choose one or the other," he says. "Iceland is doing both."
    Mr Gudnason's team of 60 police investigators and healthcare workers act as detectives on each confirmed case, tracking down those they have come in contact with.

    Testing is carried out by The National Health Service on those showing symptoms. But on top of this, a biopharma company, deCODE Genetics, has been screening random samples of the population to build the world's most extensive study yet of how the virus behaves in a population
    Testing is carried out by The National Health Service on those showing symptoms. But on top of this, a biopharma company, deCODE Genetics, has been screening random samples of the population to build the world's most extensive study yet of how the virus behaves in a population.
    Early results show 50 per cent of carriers of the virus are asymptomatic. It has also revealed up to 40 'mutations', or strains, of the disease.
    “We can determine the geographic origin of the virus in every single [virus] in Iceland,” Kári Stefánsson, founder of deCODE says.
    They claim to have traced strains back to Italy, Austria, the US, and seven cases in particular to one undisclosed football match in the UK.
    Crucially, all the testing has meant Iceland has been able to avoid a lockdown or quarantine as cases are tracked, traced and isolated before spreading rapidly - thus alleviating pressure on the hospitals.
    The data rolling in has meant authorities can "more accurately design methods" of controlling the virus, Mr Stefánsson says.
    So far there is a government ban on gatherings of more than 20 people and light guidelines on social distancing.
    The guidance is imposed not by force but by trust, Katrín Jakobsdottir, Iceland's prime minister, tells The Telegraph .
    "Iceland has a history of socially liberal culture," she says. "That means acceptance of differences and minorities, but in this case, it means to trust, not to force. We have no tradition of militarism or an army. We ask for cooperation, rather than force it."
    She adds that the science approach allows her to leave the virus policy "out of the battlefield of politics".
    The limited guidelines means business is slow for most shops, but with few exceptions the country is open for business.
    Icelanders can still get their morning coffee, sit down at local bookshops. Even stop at a local ice-cream parlour.

    In Reykjavik, life goes on as normal
    At Reykjavík Roasters, a small but popular independent cafe in Reykjavík's centre, customers trickle in despite the pandemic. The city's centre is unusually calm.
    “Honestly, what I miss more than anything are the public pools” pensioner Auður Styrkásdóttir says apologetically, adding “this is a luxury.”
    One of the main benefits of Iceland's system is the school programme has been largely unaffected.
    Pre-schools, primary, and secondary schools have stayed open while higher education has moved online.
    Some people have taken to social media asking why children's safety is perhaps taken less seriously than those of adult students.
    Mr Gudnason points out that closing down institutions that serve children has a more significant social impact
    "Our study suggests that children are less effective in spreading this virus than adults. We measure every decision with it's effectiveness and closing these institutions is unlikely to produce meaningful results at this time."
    Part of Iceland's success story is it's readiness.
    "We realised at the end of 2019 that we should prepare for a pandemic," Mr Gudnason says.
    "Our emergency system is clear, it is efficient and importantly frequently in use. Be it storms, avalanches, volcanic eruptions or a pandemic the system is the same. Health authorities step into a well-oiled machine, highly trained infrastructure and years of experience in building communication channels and trust."
    On Friday the head of Iceland's response, Víðir Reynisson, warned against drawing too much from the Iceland model, pointing out that the country's size, strong channels of communication and social cohesion helped.
    "There are many factors that make things easier on us," he said.
    Last edited by iceman; 06-04-2020 at 10:42 AM.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiora View Post
    In Iceland 1/2 show symptoms
    https://edition.cnn.com/2020/04/01/e...ntl/index.html
    In China,elsewhere as well its only 1/4(sometimes 1/8?)
    https://www.sciencealert.com/here-s-...thout-symptoms

    Whats the difference?
    Chinese less susceptible to the virus?
    Icelanders more susceptible?

    OR different mutations of virus?
    Genome testing shows slight shift in genomes from European/USA/Asian (New Zealand)
    There appears no significant difference in ethnicity or genome just timing of testing(Iceland testing entire population)
    "The prevalence of asymptomatic transmission doesn't bode well for global containment efforts, as Bill Gates recently wrote in an article published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

    "That means COVID-19 will be much harder to contain than the Middle East respiratory syndrome or severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), which were spread much less efficiently and only by symptomatic people," Gates said.


    What we know about asymptomatic and presymptomatic transmission
    The first confirmation that the novel coronavirus could be transmitted by asymptomatic people came in February, when a case study described a 20-year-old woman from Wuhan, China, who passed the coronavirus to five family members but never got physically sick herself.

    A World Health Organisation report about the coronavirus outbreak in China, published in February, found few instances in which a person who tested positive never showed any symptoms. Instead, most people who were asymptomatic on the date of their diagnosis (a relatively small group anyway) went on to develop symptoms later.

    "The proportion of truly asymptomatic infections is unclear but appears to be relatively rare," the report authors wrote.

    In the WHO study, 75 percent of people in China who were first classified as asymptomatic later developed symptoms, ProPublica reported. That means, technically, "presymptomatic transmission" is what's probably common.

    Other research has reaffirmed these findings. A CDC study of coronavirus patients in a nursing home in Washington state's King County found that of 23 people who tested positive, only 10 showed symptoms on the day of their diagnosis. Ten people in the other group developed symptoms a week later.


    "These findings have important implications for infection control," the authors wrote, adding that many public-health approaches "rely on presence of signs and symptoms to identify and isolate residents or patients who might have COVID-19."

    The CDC also evaluated coronavirus patients on the Diamond Princess cruise ship, which was quarantined in Japan in February. Of the 3,711 people onboard, 712 tested positive, but almost 50 percent of them had no symptoms at the time.

  10. #10
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    leading company Moderna , their human trials have started, interesting company and the leader atm.

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    In the absence of a vaccine any disease is very difficult to eradicate
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...5543651400070X

  12. #12
    FEAR n GREED JBmurc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kiora View Post
    In the absence of a vaccine any disease is very difficult to eradicate
    https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...5543651400070X
    Like AIDs 30yrs of trying nil vaccine
    People don't have ideas, ideas have people

  13. #13
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    Ah no,now found in tigers in NY zoo.Hopefully can't jump back other way
    https://www.smh.com.au/world/north-a...06-p54hcq.html

  14. #14
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    Covered recently on German DW.com channel:

    Link

    "Privately held Curevac, which was granted up to $8.3 million by CEPI in January, is working to draw on its low-dose vaccine technology, which has showed promise in an early-stage rabies trial, for use against the coronavirus.

    The Tuebingen, Germany, based company hopes to have an experimental vaccine ready by June or July to then seek the go-ahead from regulators for testing on humans."

    "CureVac specializes in so-called messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules that instruct human cells to produce therapeutic proteins that trigger an immune response against cancer or infectious diseases."


    more at link
    Last edited by nztx; 08-04-2020 at 02:34 AM.
    ... the fine art of sniffing out debits & credits hidden under the carpet can pay dividends ...

  15. #15
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    "If you had only heard about this study from the Fox News assertion of a “100% cure rate”, you might assume that the four patients with poor clinical outcomes (the three ICU visits and one death) had been unlucky enough to be in the group that did not receive the “cure”.

    And yet, those four patients, as well as the patient with nausea and the one who left the hospital early, were all part of the treatment group. They were excluded from the topline results of the study because of the way that the researchers chose to measure and report the results: strictly based on the measurable presence of viruses in nasal swabs taken each day of the study. Since the patients were in the ICU or dead, their samples could not be taken and they were left out of the final analysis. Based on the nasal swabs of just the 36 patients who completed the study, those who received the drug cleared the virus from their systems faster than those who did not."
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ronavirus-drug

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  17. #17
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    Not a vaccine but an effective treatment http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/a/20200...0a3d166a0.html

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by whatsup View Post
    leading company Moderna , their human trials have started, interesting company and the leader atm.
    Doubled in price since I first posted I month ago , just landed $ US 400 mil govt funds to help them out bringing their vaccine to the market, get on board while its sub $50 us.

  19. #19
    FEAR n GREED JBmurc's Avatar
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    CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the current influenza vaccine has been 45% effective overall against 2019-2020 seasonal influenza A and B viruses. Specifically, the flu vaccine has been 50% effective against influenza B/Victoria viruses and 37% effective against influenza A(H1N1) pdm09

    Will be interesting if they can create a COVID Vaccine how effective it will be>>>
    People don't have ideas, ideas have people

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBmurc View Post
    CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, the current influenza vaccine has been 45% effective overall against 2019-2020 seasonal influenza A and B viruses. Specifically, the flu vaccine has been 50% effective against influenza B/Victoria viruses and 37% effective against influenza A(H1N1) pdm09

    Will be interesting if they can create a COVID Vaccine how effective it will be>>>
    You have to as always check the benchmark and understand the concept of efficacy.

    As a comparison, let's take a common and now funded vaccine example - GSK's Varilrix varicella vaccine (for immunisation against chicken pox) had in a large active controlled clinical trial of children 12-22 months of age over 35 months results as follows:
    - Single dose of Varilrix - vaccine efficacy to confirmed varicella of any severity was 65.4%
    - Single dose of Varilrix - vaccine efficacy to a moderate to severe case of varicella it was reported at efficacy of 90.7% (97.5% confidence level).

    Further study in Uruguay indicated that 6 years after a universal mass vaccination (or more than 90% coverage) in 1999, the 2005 study indicated that hospitalisations amongst children was reduced by 81% and a study in Australia indicated that hospitalisation of pre-schoolers was reduced by 72.5% during a funded vaccination programme period compared to the pre-vaccine period.

    A second booster dose has indicated a 2600% increase in antibody count compared to a single dose alone. There isn't a published study on the efficacy of trials of a second dose but it would be expected that the efficacy would be better to any level of infection and that the efficacy to a moderate to severe case would be higher than a single dose. (NZ funds a single dose for pre-schoolers not two doses)

    Conclusion: Single dose 65% efficacy against any case doesn't sound like much but 90.7% efficacy against a moderate to severe case is the one worth noting - especially against the backdrop of understanding that it can reduce the level of severity and reduce the level of hospitalisations by 70-80%.

    CDC Flu Vaccination 2019-20
    In terms of the report that you noted, the 2019-20 CDC report on vaccine effectiveness, the discussion notes that the flu vaccination for 2019-20 has modelled to have prevented 4.4 million illness, 2.3 million medical visits, 58,000 hospitalisations and 3,500 deaths but it does note that more effective vaccines are needed.

    Summary
    So for any COVID-19 vaccine, ideally we get a vaccine that is highly effective at preventing any COVID-19 infection (efficacy against confirmed infection against COVID-19) but if that isn't the case if it had a high effectiveness against a moderate to severe case then it's going to potentially reduce severity and therefore hospitalisations/deaths/ongoing issues associated with a moderate to severe presentation of COVID-19. It potentially won't be globally eradicated like smallpox was in 1980 but it might get to the point where it could become much more manageable in conjunction with more effective antiviral or treatments for moderate to severe case presentations that require hospitalisation.
    Last edited by Rep; 07-05-2020 at 11:29 AM. Reason: Noting funding of Varilrix by NZ Government

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